Bod Mods

Will They Fade with Time?

Amanya Gonzales, Writer

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Art takes on many forms, from paintings or photographs to forked tongues and corset piercings.

Body mods aren’t a new thing, but recently they have become a new trend. Countless celebrities and influential people are seen now flaunting these types of modifications to their bodies. “More than 30% of Americans are tattooed” according to CNN Health. Although body modifications are becoming more common, there is still a stigma towards them.

In the beginning, body modifications were typically done for religious reasons. They represented the culture of the people and had deep traditional meaning. However, there has always been a connotation that people who make alterations to their body are “uncivilized” or they can be viewed as people who break the law. Blake Fales, a tattoo artist at Twisted Tattoos, notes that, “Getting a job outside of the shop is harder because people associate it with criminals.”

Tattooing holds its own risks greater than the ability to find a job. In some cases, if not treated properly, a tattoo can require medical assistance. From infections to the risk of skin cancer, tattoos and other body mods have their negatives. A bad infection to a piercing doesn’t seem, initially, like a big deal, but it can lead to blood poisoning or sepsis. Like anything, there are always safety precautions one can take to prevent these: Going to a reputable shop, using new materials, and sterilizing anything that can harm the body all lower chance bodily harm.

Despite the fact that body mods can be dangerous, it doesn’t stop people from getting them. They are common throughout the world and, because of this, they are popping up more and more in American culture. Jocelyn Turney,11, recounts the reason she got her tattoo. “It honestly was because it gave me a rush of adrenaline.” With so many opportunities out there to alter one’s body, it can be easy to see why it has become so trendy.

In 20 years, this question remains: Will tattoos be the new norm or will they fade like the very ink from which they were created?